Section 21 company

Parliament building in Bloemfontein, South Afr...

Interested in forming a section 21 company?

Great!

“Section 21 company” is the name of non-profit companies registered in South Africa under the old Companies Act 1973 as amended.

The new name for a Section 21 company under South Africa’s new Companies Act, 2008 is “Non-Profit Company” abbreviated to “NPC”.

Information on registering an NPC through us

Hope for small business

Anna Phosa's workers

Port Elizabeth small business owners were given a boost on Wednesday following a gathering where up and coming local entrepreneurs got the opportunity to grow their firms.

The Hope Factory, a hub for entrepreneurs in the city, hosted two events at North End in a bid to strengthen entrepreneurs’ capacity in growing and sustaining their enterprises.

Sipho Ntlangu, one of The Hope Hub entrepreneurs, said the programme had made a positive impact in terms of business growth.

The Hope Factory launched The Hope Hub a year ago with the purpose of helping small business owners to showcase their products.

“It also provided me with more exposure for business, as many people are now aware of the whereabouts of my business. There is a great potential to increase sales and to make profits,” said Ntlangu.

According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor study, there are few South Africans who try their hand at entrepreneurship and only 2.6% survive through the three-and-a-half year mark.

“Some of the reasons for this failure rate include a lack of skills, limited access to markets, no seed capital, a lack of work experience and a lack of confidence.

via Hope for small business | The New Age Online.

Small-business ministry coming

Greenhouse tomatoes

The development of small businesses — which industry players say is retarded by unnecessary red tape and lack of access to finance — is seen as key to reducing the country’s unemployment.

Official statistics put South Africa’s unemployment at about 25%. If people who have given up looking for work are included goes up to more than 40%.

via Small-business ministry ‘a step closer’ | Business | BDlive.

Spotlight On Small Business Development

The main entrance to the International Convent...

The 37th International Small Business Congress, taking place in Johannesburg from 15-18 September, will help to chart the way for small business development in South Africa, with a particular focus on emerging industries.

Briefing journalists in Cape Town on Monday, Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies said the congress would provide a platform “to benchmark and draw lessons from both the developed and developing countries with a view of sharpening policy development and high impact programmes in the South African SMME sector”.

It will be the first time that the congress is held on the African soil, and more than 1 000 international delegates are expected to descend on the Sandton Convention Centre to discuss the future and role of SMEs in the global economy.

International Small Business Congress president Catherine Swift will be joining speakers from South Africa, Canada, England, Nigeria, Malaysia, Northern Ireland, Cameroon, Japan, France, Mauritius, Sierra Leone and India.

The theme of the congress will be “Fostering small business in new and high-potential industries worldwide”.

Davies said this theme was “of particular importance to South Africa, especially as we widen the market for South African goods and services through stronger focus on exports to the region and other economic groupings such as Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS).

via allAfrica.com: South Africa: Spotlight On Small Business Development.

Small Business Congress

CAPE TOWN/SOUTH AFRICA, 11JUN2009 - Rob Davies...

The 37th International Small Business Congress, taking place in Johannesburg from 15-18 September, will help to chart the way for small business development in South Africa, with a particular focus on emerging industries.

Briefing journalists in Cape Town on Monday, Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies said the congress would provide a platform “to benchmark and draw lessons from both the developed and developing countries with a view of sharpening policy development and high impact programmes in the South African SMME sector”.

It will be the first time that the congress is held on the African soil, and more than 1 000 international delegates are expected to descend on the Sandton Convention Centre to discuss the future and role of SMEs in the global economy.

International Small Business Congress president Catherine Swift will be joining speakers from South Africa, Canada, England, Nigeria, Malaysia, Northern Ireland, Cameroon, Japan, France, Mauritius, Sierra Leone and India.

The theme of the congress will be “Fostering small business in new and high-potential industries worldwide”.

Davies said this theme was “of particular importance to South Africa, especially as we widen the market for South African goods and services through stronger focus on exports to the region and other economic groupings such as Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS).

via Spotlight on small business development – SouthAfrica.info.

SARS monitoring your bank account

BERLIN, GERMANY - OCTOBER 13:  Model Nadja Aue...

Government Gazette no. 35090 (the Gazette), issued on the February 29 2012, has fundamentally changed the access the South African Revenue Services (Sars) has to every person’s bank account information.

The Gazette gives notice that in terms of section 69 of the Income Tax Act all “reporting institutions” are required to submit bi-annual returns directly to Sars in respect of all monies “invested with, loaned to and deposited” with the reporting institution, and in respect of interest received by or accrued to any person from the “reporting institution”. The first returns, covering the period 1 March 2012 to 31 August 2012 are required to be submitted to Sars by 31 October 2012.

Accountholders may be lulled into a false sense of security in understanding this to mean that all banks will now simply submit information of all interest paid by the bank to an accountholder directly to Sars, instead of the accountholder being required to disclose the information to Sars themselves. Further reading of the Gazette proves this understanding dangerously inadequate.

Firstly, it is important to note how widely the gazette defines a “reporting institution”. Included in the definition are, for example, all banks (including Postbank), companies listed on the JSE that issue bonds, debentures and similar financial instruments and organs of state that issue bonds (government bonds).

Secondly, that the “reporting institutions” must submit returns for both natural persons and, as per the Gazette, “other persons” which will include companies and trusts.

Thirdly, and possibly of greatest concern, is the information the Gazette dictates each return must contain. Whilst the requirements differ slightly for natural and “other” persons, the issues raised below are common to both.

The returns must disclose for all persons: identity particulars and tax reference numbers, the closing balances of the accounts at the end of the relevant six-month period, any interest amounts received or accrued by the persons from the “reporting institutions” and interestingly, monthly totals of all debits and credits to the accounts.

No clarity has been provided on the use Sars will make of this information. The information at the very least will assist Sars in identifying all persons who should be registered for Income Tax and VAT purposes and the non-disclosure of all receipts and accruals (local and foreign) by registered taxpayers when making provisional payments and submitting returns.

via Moneywebtax – Sars has more access to your bank account – Income tax.

South African women entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurs

The 2012 Sanlam / Business Partners Entrepreneur of the Year competition has seen a  5% increase in the number of female finalists  which is a critical sign that speaks to general health of the South African economy, say organizers of the competition.

The resonates well with  the GEM research report on South Africa which showed that the total early-stage Entrepreneurial Activity (TEA) for South African females improved by 161.3% from 2001 – 2010, growing from 3.1% to 8.1%.

In a statement the organizers said female entrepreneurial activity has been proven to be a major catalyst in triggering economic growth in developing countries.

via South African women venture into entrepreneurship | UJUH.

How accountants can save the world

Accountants' Office

Will accountants save the world? That was one of the most provocative questions to come out of the Rio+20 conference on sustainable development last week.

While it will take some time to get an answer to that question, the fact that it’s being asked demonstrates the level of concrete involvement in sustainability issues by the business community, which was more involved — and more engaged — than at any United Nations conference in history. And at least at the city and organization levels, cross-sector collaboration was evident, declarations rampant and commitment to concrete action well underway.

Especially in the finance sector, where arguably the most opportunity exists, I heard a lot that gave me reason to hope. During my time in Rio, I talked to bankers, accountants, business leaders and academics — all of whom spoke passionately about the need to value and appropriately account for nature.

Here are five efforts that stood out as examples of the role that just about every stakeholder in the financial markets system — bankers, investors, insurers, corporations, accountants, top executives, stock exchanges, or financial analysts — can play:

Natural Capital Declaration (NCD)’s 39 banks, investors and insurers (see Principles for Sustainable Insurance) joining forces with more than 50 countries — including the UK, Philippines and South Africa, as well as corporations, including Unilever, Dow Chemical and Puma — to make a collective call for natural capital valuation. A strong start, but one issue is that the larger financial institutions are not yet involved.

via How accountants can save the world — maybe | GreenBiz.com.

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SAICA extends tax offering to public

Institute of Chartered Accountants Australia -...

Johannesburg, Wednesday, 25 April 2012 – As tax legislation continues to be more complex and turbulent, the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants Saica has launched the Tax Suite, a tax knowledge-based platform aimed at keeping local practitioners, advisers and just about anyone that has anything to do with tax abreast of international and local best practice.Offered to both Saica members and non-members alike, the subscription-based web product is a comprehensive and broad tax resource offering on the South African market, backed by the countrys authoritative chartered accounting body.

Chartered Accountants already have access to Saicas normal tax resources, but the Tax Suite goes beyond this. It provides a great opportunity for all participants in the tax space, not affiliated with the institute, to receive a range of services at CA-quality levels not yet seen in the marketplace,” explains Saicas Standards Senior Executive Muneer Hassan pictured.According to Hassan, no other tax resource on the market delivers the same value-add that the Tax Suite does. Not only is there value inherent in court case analyses, Tax Suite newsletters and journals, and in the business matching feature, but the Tax Suite is staffed by a uniquely qualified team.There are, according to SARS, more than 34,000 tax practitioners in South Africa. Hassan believes that the Tax Suite service will find wide appeal from both members who practice in tax, and from a much wider audience of tax practitioners. “We have already received positive feedback from the legal fraternity, and the broad tax advisory industry. There are competitive offerings,” says Hassan. “but none that have the depth of staff, or value that our Tax Suite provides. We are confident that this service will become South Africas premier tax reference site in a short space of time.”

via Moneywebtax – Saica extends tax offering to public – Integritax.

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Making jobs for people

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - JANUARY 21:  In t...

“The real issue is not the target, the real issue is can we mobilise all of the South African resources… in order that all of us do what we can to put people into some kind of job,” Gordhan told the Foreign Correspondents Association in Johannesburg.

This included government, business and civil society.”We are not doing enough in South Africa as a whole,” he said.

The government had set the target of five million jobs by 2020, but Gordhan said it was more important to get everyone into some kind of job.

“In respect of our younger people, to have the basic experience of working, that is the objective at this point in time.”

Job creation was not the sole preserve of government, he said.

“You cant just look at government, because 70% of those jobs must come from the private sector.”

Its the private sector that must create jobs. For them to do this they must invest.”Gordhan said businesses had around R500 billion in profit surplus lying in banks, which they should be investing. Business, however, was risk averse, which he said was to some extent understandable.

Recent comments by First National Bank CEO Michael Jordaan were quite instructive, Gordhan said. Gordhan said Jordaan had said South African businesses needed to take a medium or long-term view, not just react to short-term risks.

“There are immense prospects that other countries are seeing on the African continent, that we ourselves are not seeing adequately,” Gordhan said.Business should also be taking advantage of opportunities offered by South Africas membership of BRICS – the Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa economic partnership.

Gordhan said there needed to be frank talk about what was holding up investment, especially as the economy was recovering.

“The globe is not going to collapse… after every crisis there is a recovery. We are in a period of recovery, just a very uncertain one… [its] not very smooth.”

When asked whether South Africas labour laws were restricting job creation, Gordhan said there were efficient structures in South Africa for raising these issues.

“Whichever side has concerns should use those forums and create a climate for dialogue… and resolution so that we can move ahead.”

He said international organisations had different views on whether South Africas labour legislation was rigid.

“And by and large the view would be that we are not an overly rigid economy.”

He said anyone with concerns about the proposed labour law amendments should approach Labour Minister Mildred Oliphant as she had an open door.

The Basic Conditions of Employment Amendment Bill and the Labour Relations Amendment Bill were adopted by Cabinet last month. They would now be considered by the Parliamentary portfolio committee on labour before being submitted to the National Assembly and the National Council of Provinces for adoption.

This was after over a year of debate on the two bills in the National Economic Development and Labour Council.

via All of South Africa needs to create jobs: Gordhan – Times LIVE.

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