Register your informal business

Sarah Mathebula, 32, of Diepsloot, runs a vegetable business in the informal settlement and it is her only source of income.

Mathebula, a mother of five, arrived in Diepsloot in 2001. With no education, she started selling sweets, saving every rand.

Diepsloot has an estimated population of more than 250000 and is notorious for street justice, crime, unemployment and poverty.

So for many residents like Mathebula the only way to survive is to start a business.

“I would love to get support from the government or the city authorities to expand my business and get a proper place to trade.”

Mathebula said the relationship between the many small businesses in the area and the new entrants – Somalis and Pakistani nationals – was now good.

She is one of the 400 members of the South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry, who have now been organised to achieve economic growth in the area.

Phineas Letsoalo, project coordinator of the Diepsloot Chamber of Business, said the organisation started in May last year and faced many challenges on its path.

His chamber will be part of the Sacci’s conference, gala dinner and exhibition, that will be held at the Sandton Convention Centre on Monday and Tuesday.

Sowetan, the print media partner of the conference, will give an opportunity to 50 SMMEs and entrepreneurs to attend the convention for free.

To secure a seat contact the convention secretariat on 011-676-3467 or e-mail: sacciconvention@globalconf.co.za and use the Reference SOWETAN. Offer closes today at 12pm.

“The first challenge was the political landscape. You will find that developmental projects go through a political office and often information is not accessible to entrepreneurs,” he said.

He said another big challenge was that businesses were not formalised and do not even have addresses.

This, he said, increase the risk for banks and investors who would identify business opportunity in Diepsloot.

“People do not even Iknow how to register their businesses and they use whatever land is available without going through proper channels. Corrupt officials then utilised this ignorance and solicit rent from these businesses,” he said.

Mathebula said the business community in informal settlements needed to be organised and his chamber has started to engage developmental agencies to assist entrepreneurs in Diepsloot.

via The means to survive – Sowetan LIVE.

Business in Population Management

Global population numbers are on track to reach 7 billion in 2011, just 12 years after reaching 6 billion in 1999. Virtually all of the growth is in developing countries.

And the growth of the world’s youth population (ages 15 to 24) is shifting into the poorest of those countries.

The new Population Reference Bureau’s 2009 World Population Data Sheet, offers detailed information about country, regional, and global population patterns.

In the context of CSR, I find it interesting that we talk a lot about the environment and its connections with growth and we discuss at length the use (and abuse) of natural resources and links to climate change.

Yet, one of the major challenges that businesses could play a role in relates to birth control and population management.

via A Role for Business in Population Management | Use Celsias.com

SA needs to start more businesses

Perhaps I am being melodramatic, but let’s take a look at some numbers.. Data that tracks the total entrepreneurship activity of some countries has shown that South Africa is waning in terms of entrepreneurship activity.

In a recent report released by FNB and Endeavor South African about the state of South African Entrepreneurship shows that the total entrepreneurial activity for SA is 5%, which is less than half that of India, Brazil and Mexico.

Total entrepreneurship activity is a global index and it measures how much of the labor force of a particular country has started a business and also includes people who have kept businesses going for the last 3.5 years.

In 2001, the total entrepreneurship activity for South Africa was 9.3% and our labour force was about 12.4 million. This probably meant that about 1 153 200 people in South Africa’s labour force were pursuing some kind of entrepreneurial activity.

According to figures released recently by Statistics South Africa, the labour force is currently sitting at 17.7 million. From my calculations, about five percent of our labour force is 885000.

So perhaps it’s not a death as reflected in my sensationalist, dramatic headline, but it is a cause for concern. In 2009, the African country that came out tops in terms of percentage in Africa was Uganda.

via Is entrepreneurship dying? | The Scribblers

Jobless rate hits 25,7% – labour recession

SA’s unemployment rate climbed to 25,7% in the second quarter — its highest in seven years — as an influx of job seekers into the labour market surpassed job creation.

Analysts were shocked at the news from Statistics SA yesterday, which showed the jobless rate leaping sharply from 25% in the first quarter.

Overall, the number of employed people rose by 7000 in the second quarter — a far cry from the number needed to reach the government’s goal of creating 5-million new jobs by 2020.

“We are still in a labour recession,” T-Sec economist Mike Schussler said yesterday. “The economy might be growing but it’s not creating jobs.”

via BusinessDay – Jobless rate hits 25,7% as ‘labour recession’ grips SA

Department of Home Affairs

Firstly, the DHA is custodian, protector and verifier of the identity and status of citizens and other persons resident in South Africa. This makes it possible for people to realize their rights and access benefits and opportunities in both the public and private domains. By expanding these services to marginalized communities, the department plays is a key enabler in deepening democracy and social justice.

Secondly, the DHA controls, regulates and facilitates immigration and the movement of persons through ports of entry. It also provides civics and immigration services at foreign missions; and determines the status of asylum seekers and refugees in accordance with international obligations. The department thus makes a significant contribution to ensuring national security, enabling economic development and promoting good international relations.

Department of Home Affairs

National Treasury

The National Treasury is responsible for managing South Africa’s national government finances. Supporting efficient and sustainable public financial management is fundamental to the promotion of economic development, good governance, social progress and a rising standard of living for all South Africans. The Constitution of the Republic (Chapter 13) mandates the National Treasury to ensure transparency, accountability and sound financial controls in the management of public finances.

The National Treasury’s legislative mandate is also described in the Public Finance Management Act (Chapter 2). The National Treasury is mandated to promote government’s fiscal policy framework; to coordinate macroeconomic policy and intergovernmental financial relations; to manage the budget preparation process; to facilitate the Division of Revenue Act, which provides for an equitable distribution of nationally raised revenue between national, provincial and local government; and to monitor the implementation of provincial budgets.

As mandated by the executive and Parliament, the National Treasury will continue to support the optimal allocation and utilisation of financial resources in all spheres of government to reduce poverty and vulnerability among South Africa’s most marginalised.

Over the next 10 years National Treasury priorities include increasing investment in infrastructure and industrial capital; improving education and skills development to raise productivity; improving the regulation of markets and public entities; and fighting poverty and inequality through efficient public service delivery, expanded employment levels, income support and empowerment.

via National Treasury