SABS

The South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) is a statutory body that was established in terms of the Standards Act, 1945 (Act No. 24 of 1945) and continues to operate in terms of the latest edition of the Standards Act, 2008 (Act No. 29 of 2008) as the national institution for the promotion and maintenance of standardisation and quality in connection with commodities and the rendering of services.

As the national standardisation authority, the SABS is responsible for maintaining South Africa’s database of more than 6,500 national standards, as well as developing new standards and revising, amending or withdrawing existing standards as required.

Internationally, SABS experts represent South Africa’s interests in the development of international standards, through their engagement with bodies such as the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). South Africa has a long and proud history of involvement with these bodies and was a founder member of ISO. On a regional level, the SABS currently holds the Secretariat for SADCSTAN, the standardisation body for the Southern African Development Community of 14 nations.

SABS Commercial (Pty) Ltd, a self-financing division within the SABS, offers certification, testing, consignment inspection and other services, mostly to industry. Apart from offering systems certification and product testing against the requirements of South African National Standards (SANS), SABS Commercial also operates its proprietary product certification scheme – the SABS Mark of Approval – a universally recognised icon in South Africa, assuring buyers that products are safe, fit for purpose and offer redress.

via South African Bureau of Standards – Wikipedia

SABC

Official SABC website

A throwback to the Apartheid days, many opposition politicians believe the SABC to be the mouthpiece of the ANC government or “SANC”, just as it was that of the National Party. Despite a change in government, this public perception was reinforced when, in August 2005, the SABC came under heavy fire from non-affiliated media and the public for failing to broadcast a scene whereby Deputy President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka was booed offstage by members of the ANC Youth League, who were showing support for the newly-axed ex-Deputy President, Jacob Zuma.

Rival broadcaster eTV publicly accused SABC of ‘biased reporting’ by failing to show the video footage of the humiliated Deputy President, but Snuki Zikalala, Head of News and ex-ANC spokesperson retorted by stating that their cameraman was not present at the meeting, a claim later established to be false when eTV footage was released which showed an SABC cameraman filming the incident.

SABC’s government connections also came under scrutiny when, in April 2005, Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe was interviewed live by Zikalala, who is a former ANC political commissar. The interview held was deemed by the public eye to have side-stepped ‘critical issues’ and controversial questions regarding Mugabe’s radical land-reform policies and human rights violations.

In May 2006, the SABC was accused of self censorship, when it decided not to air a documentary on South African President Thabo Mbeki, and in early June requested that the producers (from Daylight Films) not speak about it. This has been widely criticised by independent media groups. In response, the International Freedom of Expression Exchange issued an alert concerning the SABC’s apparent trend toward self-censorship.

In June 2006 the International Federation of Journalists denounced the cancelling of the Thabo Mbeki documentary, citing “self censorship” and “politically influenced managers”.

Also in June 2006, SAfm host John Perlman disclosed on air that the SABC had created a blacklist of commentators. A commission of inquiry was created by SABC CEO Dali Mpofu into the allegations that individuals were blacklisted at the behest of Zikalala.[11][12]

Critics, including the influential newspaper, Mail and Guardian (Vol 24, No 35) have accused the broadcaster of cultural myopia by failing to recognize the diverse cultural mix of South Africa and excessive favoring of certain ethnic groups in their choice of entertainment offered particularly by the TV services.

via South African Broadcasting Corporation – Wikipedia

Eskom

Eskom is a South African electricity public utility, established in 1923 as the Electricity Supply Commission (ESCOM) by the government of South Africa in terms of the Electricity Act (1922). It was also known by its Afrikaans name Elektrisiteitsvoorsieningskommissie (EVKOM). The two acronyms were combined in 1986 and the company is now known as Eskom. Eskom represents South Africa in the Southern African Power Pool.

The utility is the largest producer of electricity in Africa, is among the top seven utilities in the world in terms of generation capacity and among the top nine in terms of sales.

Eskom operates a number of notable power stations, including Kendal Power Station, and Koeberg nuclear power station in the Cape Province, the only nuclear power plant in Africa. The company is divided into Generation, Transmission and Distribution divisions and together Eskom generates approximately 95% of electricity used in South Africa.

Due to the South African government’s attempted privatisation of Eskom in the late 1990s, Eskom’s requests for budget to build new stations were denied. President Thabo Mbeki admitted in December 2007 that this was an error, and it is now adversely affecting the South African economy.[4]

In January 2008 Eskom introduced “load shedding”, planned rolling blackouts based on a rotating schedule, in periods where short supply threatens the integrity of the grid. Demand-side management has focussed on encouraging consumers to conserve power during peak periods in order to reduce the incidence of load shedding.

via Eskom – Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Funders welcome proposed tax incentive for angel investors

However, the draft law proposes to open the incentive so that all taxpaying entities can benefit from deductions, and to remove the R750000-a-year threshold for deductions. It also proposes to lift the turnover threshold of those small businesses that can qualify for investments from a venture capital company from R10m to R20m, and from R100m to R300m for a junior mining company. It also proposes to allow investors to take controlling stakes in the qualifying venture capital fund they invest in.

via BusinessDay – Funders welcome proposed tax incentive for angel investors